Thursday, May 21, 2020

Vertically and Horizontally Integrated Supply Chains - Free Essay Example

Sample details Pages: 8 Words: 2483 Downloads: 7 Date added: 2017/06/26 Category Business Essay Type Compare and contrast essay Did you like this example? Introduction Vertically and horizontally integrated supply chains are supply chain management strategies adopted by companies to take advantage of synergies in their value chain to achieve more profits and competitive advantage (Naslund Willamson, 2010). Effective supply chains are critical to the success of organisations operating in global multifaceted environments as well as organisations seeking to achieve optimal efficiency and customer satisfaction (Lambert, 2008). An increasingly competitive and interconnected global environment means that successful performance depends on the collective decisions and actions of all members of a supply chain rather than that of a single member and competition is increasingly between supply chains rather than between individual firms (Naslund Willamson, 2010). Don’t waste time! Our writers will create an original "Vertically and Horizontally Integrated Supply Chains" essay for you Create order Hence, organisations are faced with the challenge of making decisions regarding appropriate supply chain strategies that will deliver their objectives based on their capabilities, needs and circumstances. Vertical and Horizontal supply chain integration are two such strategies that enable companies to manage their organisations and their relationships with other companies in the same supply chain/value chain (Hill Jones, 2012). From a supply chain management perspective, vertical and horizontal integration aim to achieve cost savings, higher profits, greater efficiency and customer satisfaction by improving supply chain processes and performance through value-adding investment and activities that benefit all supply chain members (Stonebraker Liao, 2003). For example, achieving cost reductions, improved performance and better target market access as a result of eliminating redundancies/duplications, lowering inventories, shorter lead times, greater control over supply and distrib ution, access to partner networks and lower fixed costs (Mentzer et al., 2008). This essay will discuss and analyse key similarities and differences between vertically and horizontally integrated supply chains, highlighting the key issues and the scope of organisational departments involved. Supply Chain Management (SCM) Simchi-Levi et al. (2008) defined SCM as integration strategies aimed at coordinating functions across suppliers, manufacturers, distributors and retailers to ensure that products and services are produced and distributed at the right volume, location and time with the aim of reducing operational costs, maximising profits and ensuring satisfaction across the supply chain.. Vertically and horizontally integrated supply chains are SCM strategies introduced in the early 1980s with roots in the logistics literature. Supply Chain Integration Strategies Supply chain integration strategies are network-based business models used by organisations to align strategic decisions and processes across the network from supplier/manufacturer end to the customer end in order to achieve competitive advantages, synergy and efficiency in their operations as well as to gain more control in the input and output of their operations (Hill Jones, 2012). Network-based business models are organisational structures that allow companies to operate as interconnected configurations across its value chain usually consisting of partnerships, collaborations and optimised cross-organizational activities (Mentzer, 2008). Vertical Integration Vertical integration is a coordination strategy in which a company owns its supply chain by incorporating supplier and/or distributor supply chains in its operations strategy or by expanding its operations to perform activities traditionally performed by suppliers and distributors (Hill Jones, 2012). This strategy helps organizations to ensure high levels of control and to avoid the hold up problem, a situation in which an organisations contract with another party in its supply chain results in delays and loss of profit due to delays, non-performance of contract or imbalance of bargaining power between the 2 parties (Hill Jones, 2012). The Ford River Rouge Complex, an automobile factory built by Henry Ford in 1927 is a good example of a vertically integrated supply chain providing economies of scale and ensuring high levels of control in the supply and production process Iron ore and coal from Ford owned mines arrived on Ford freighters to produce Ford steel. Ford also owned its timberlands, glass plants, rail lines and rubber plantation, which helped to ensure efficiency, availability of necessary components as well as control over inputs and outputs (Slywotzky, 1996). A vertical integrated supply chain can be implemented to varying degrees, broadly classified into 3 categories: Backward vertical integration, in which a company owns subsidiaries that produce the inputs/components used in production. For example, the Ford River Rouge Factory with its own timberland and glass making companies (Slywotzky, 1996). Forward vertical Integration in which a company owns or controls its distribution centres and/or retailers, thereby having direct contact with customers at the bottom of the value chain. For example, airlines performing the traditional roles of travel agents (Hill and Jones, 2012). Balanced vertical Integration in which a company implements both backward and forward integration by owning/controlling its supply, production, marketing and/or retail centres. Apple is a good example of a company implementing balanced vertical integration by owning their own data centres, manufacturing equipment to produce their own chips and other proprietary components, as well as their own marketing and retail stores, content platforms and support centres (Hill and Jones, 2012). As a strategic tool, a vertically integrated supply chain can provide companies with solutions to mitigate or remove the threat of powerful suppliers, decrease bargaining powers of suppliers, distributors and customers as well as reduce transaction costs. When properly implemented, a vertically integrated supply chain can help companies achieve competitive advantage and higher profits through economies of scale and scope (Fresard et al., 2014). Horizontal Integration Horizontal Integration is a single industry SCM strategy whereby companies seek to achieve competitive advantage and profitable growth through value creation activities that are focused on a single business or industry, for example, McDonalds with its focus on global fast-food business and Walmart, with its focus on global discount retailing (Hill Jones, 2012). A horizontally integrated supply chain is a business model whereby companies acquire or merge with industry competitors to achieve competitive advantage through economies of scale and scope (Fresard et al., 2014). For example, Boeing merged with McDonnell Douglas to create the worlds largest aerospace company, Pfizer acquired Warner-Lambert to become the largest pharmaceutical company (Hill and Jones, 2012) This SCM structure provides the advantage of focus and scope, particularly in fast growing, dynamic industries where companies are required to focus substantial resources and capabilities on competing in one area in o rder to achieve long term competitive advantage (Lambert, 2008). Technological advancements, changing customer needs, fierce competition and low levels of entry barriers are common features of horizontally integrated supply chains. Due to changing customer needs, new competition and the pace of change in such industries, companies often find it difficult to sustain competitive advantage without changing/adapting their business model (Juttner et al. 2010). For example, with the advent of wireless telephone service and the likes of SKYPE, companies like ATT had to quickly adapt their business model and join forces wireless companies that provided them with the capability to start offering broadband and wireless services. Its merger with Time Warner and Comcast enabled ATTs competitive positioning and its relevance in the changing world of telecommunications (Hill and Jones, 2012). A successfully implemented horizontal integration strategy can increase a companys profitability due t o reduction in cost structures as a result of (Hill and Jones, 2012): Economies of scale, particularly in industries with high fixed cost structures; Increased product differentiation due to the combined product lines from merger or acquisition which enables the company to be able to offer product bundles and innovative new products to customers at different price points; Replication of the business model due to the ability to leverage the increased product differentiation and lower cost structure achieved through horizontal integration to replicate the business model in new market segment, for example Walmart using its low-cost discount retail business model to enter into the warehouse and supermarket segments in the US as well replicating the model globally as by acquiring supermarket chains in several countries; Reduced industry rivalry, as excess capacity is eliminated in the industry through acquisition or merging of competitors which results in more stable price environments and the elimination/reduction of price wars; Increased bargaining power due to the consolidation of the industry resulting in companies that are a much larger buyer and hence wield a level of leverage or buyer power which can be used to drive down the price it pays to suppliers. Walmart is a good example of a horizontally integrated supply chain with bargaining power advantage. Horizontal integration has limitations that are worth noting and guarding against. Similar to vertical integration, horizontal integration is a complex and difficult strategy to implement. For example, it is difficult to successfully merge companies with very different corporate cultures and where the merge/acquisition is a hostile takeover, it often results in high staff turnover and loss of much needed talent and expertise hence resulting suboptimal benefits or downright failure. There is also the risk of failure or penalty due to antitrust laws when companies attempt to use horizontal integration to become a dominant industry player as these laws exist to ensure fair trading and prevent companies from using their market powers to prevent competition. Vertical and Horizontal Integration Key issues to consider: Similarities Vertically and horizontally integrated supply chains are usually complex and capital intensive to implement. Both are also similar in the sense that they are business models that are aimed at optimising value chain processes and performance in other to achieve competitive advantage through economies of scale and scope. However, organisations need to consider several factors to ascertain the right strategy and whether it will be a profitable investment, including (Fresard et al., 2014): Are there economies of scope to make it cheaper for the company to own or control subsidiaries involved in the supply and production of its inputs and outputs? Is there need to establish entry barrier in the industry or obtain monopoly power by controlling the value chain in order to have competitive advantage? Is it cheaper overall for the company to perform the role of suppliers and distributors than to conduct business with arms length suppliers and distributors? Differences Companies pursuing vertical integration may also pursue horizontal integration and in fact many do. However, the underlying principles and the operational implications of implementing both strategies have very clear differentiators. In a vertical integration, the company enters new industries to support the business model of its core industry, whereas in a horizontal integration, the company competes in a single industry but expands through mergers, acquisitions and strategic alliances/collaborations. Vertical integration is more closed/proprietary model compared to horizontal integration which is more open because of the involvement of partners and the need to cooperate/collaborate. The differences in the operational implications include (Hill and Jones, 2012): Vertical integration Horizontal integration More control through ownership of the value-adding stages. Less control due to dependence on others cooperation. The vertically integrated company reaps the higher benefit. Benefits are from the success of everyone in the value chain Efficiency over flexibility Flexibility over maximum efficiency Intensive capital required to create, produce, and distribute all components of the end product. Lower capital requirements due to shared ownership. Departmental Functions One of the challenges faced by organization in managing their supply chain is that of integrating internal functions as well as the entire supply chain (Christopher Juttner,2000). Understanding the supply chain begins with understanding internal processes as this directly impacts performance. From a supply chain perspective, key internal processes include (Pagell, 2004): Purchasing, responsible for buying process inputs Operations, responsible for the transformation of raw materials into final outputs Logistics, responsible for the management of processes involved in the production and delivery of outputs to customers The key task in managing these functions is to ensure a process of interaction and collaboration in which purchasing, operations and logistics work together to achieve the mutual objectives of the supply chain. Stakeholder Management In vertical integration, the proprietary nature of the investment creates a more closed/not very trusting approach in the interaction with partners as the organization will seek to protect its trade secrets/intellectual property. In horizontal integration however, companies adopt a more open and trusting approach with partners, as this is integral to the success of their business model (Hill and Jones, 2012). For example, Microsoft and Google have adopted a more open approach to working with partners in their values chain as the success is achieved collaboratively and through open source platforms. Apple on the other hand operates a proprietary model, which tightly protects its intellectual property through its vertically integrated supply chain (Pomfret Soh, 2010). Conclusion The decision between vertical or horizontal integration will determine an organisations operating strategy and the supply chain dynamics in terms of how functional departments and stakeholders interact. The challenge is to analyse how new emerging technologies will impact their business models, how and why these technologies might change customer needs and customer groups in the future, and what kinds of new distinctive competencies will be needed to respond to these changes (Hill and Jones, 2012). In the end it is all about what is right for the organisation in terms of its objectives, capabilities and customer value proposition and how that can be achieved efficiently and profitably. References Awad, A.H., and Nassar, M.O. (2010). Supply Chain Integration: Definition and Challenges. Proceedings of the International Multi Conference of Engineers and Computer Scientists Vol. 1. pp.17-19 Christopher, M. and Juttner, U. (2000). Developing Strategic Partnerships in the Supply Chain: A Practitioner Perspective. European Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, Vol. 6 (2), pp. 117-27. Fresard, L., Hoberg, G., and Phillips, G., 2014, The incentives for vertical acquisitions and integration, Discussion paper Working Paper University of Maryland. Available from : https://www-bcf.usc.edu/~gordonph/Papers/vertical_integration.pdf Hill, C.W.L., and Jones, G.R. (2012) Strategic Management: An Integrated Approach (10th Edition). Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning. Juttner,U., Christopher, M., and Godsell, J. (2010). A Strategic Framework for integrating Marketing and Supply Chain Strategies. The International Journal of Logistics Management Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 104 -126. Lambert, D. (2008). An executive summary of Supply Chain Management: Process, Partnerships, Performance, Jacksonville: The Hartley Press, Inc. Mentzer, J., Stank, T. and Esper, T. (2008), Supply chain management and its relationship to logistics, marketing, production and operations management, Journal of Business Logistics, Vol. 29 (1), pp. 31-45. Mentzer, J., De Wett, W., James, K., Min, S., Nix, N., Smith, C. and Zacharia, Z. (2001), Defining supply chain management, Journal of Business Logistics, Vol. 22 (2), pp. 1-25. Naslund, D., and Williamson, S. (2010). What is Management in Supply Chain Management? A Critical Review of Definitions, Frameworks and Terminology. Journal of Management Policy and Practice Vol. 11(4). pp.11-28 Pagell, M. (2004) Understanding the Factors that Enable and Inhibit the Integration of Operations, Purchasing and Logistics. Journal of Operations Management Vol. 22 (5) pp. 459à ¢Ã¢â€š ¬Ã¢â‚¬Å"487. Pomfret, J., and Soh, K. (2010) For Apple Suppliers, Loose Lips Can Sink Contracts, [Online] available from www.reuters.com/assets/print?aid=USTRE61G3XA20100217 Slywotzky, Adrian J. (1996), Value Migration: How to Think Several Moves Ahead of the Competition, Boston: Harvard Business School Press. Simchi-Levi, D., Kaminsky, P., and Simchi-Levi, E. (2008). Designing and Managing the Supply Chain: Concepts, Strategies, and Cases (3rd edition). New York: McGraw-Hill. Waters, D. (2008) Supply Chain Management: An Introduction to Logistics (2nd Edition). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Education and Technology Integration An Annotated...

Education and Technology Integration: An Annotated Bibliography Education is among the sectors that have benefited the most from the advent of modern technology, and especially information and communication technology (ICT). Traditional education systems faced many challenges and huge limitations at delivery, in practice, and in application. Tools of education such as chalk, blackboard, books, classrooms, laboratory items, and so on, were mostly manual and cumbersome. Even the structure of the traditional literature content, and pedagogy was a challenge to both the teacher and the learner. The advent of modern technology and its integration with the education systems has opened up many possibilities, and forced educational practitioners to rethink and restructure the content, pedagogical tools, and methods of delivery. As a result, the educational system has evolved continually, and at the same time opening up new and countless opportunities. This has definitely captured the imagination of many students, researchers, and professionals. The integration of technology with education has brought about phenomenal opportunities as well as radical changes to the educational sector. Examples include the use of digital pedagogy, computer-aided instruction (CAI), distance or open learning, virtual universities, computer-based online testing, digital libraries, and so on. The benefits of integrating technology with education are phenomenal. The uptake of technology by manyShow MoreRelatedGeneral Movements Assessment ( An Annotated Bibliography1587 Words   |  7 Pages †¢ General Movements Assessment (Summer 2014) o As an innovative teaching practice, the student completed an annotated bibliography regarding the General Movements Assessment (see Artifact XI.F.vi.1). This annotated bibliography was subsequently utilized for development of the Institutional Review Board Application (submitted to Cleveland Clinic and Cleveland State University) as well as with faculty development of regional and national conference presentations (Using Prechtl’s Assessment of GeneralRead MoreAnnotated Bibliography1329 Words   |  6 Pagesï » ¿ Annotated Bibliography Galen College of Nursing Annotated Bibliography Mayo Clinic (2011). Personal health record: A tool for managing your health. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/personal-health-record/MY00665 This source talks about how electronic health records makes it easy to gather and manage medical information in a secure location (Mayo Clinic, 2001, pg. 1). They explain what a health record is and what goes into it. The advantages and disadvantages toRead MoreResearch of Technology in the Classroom Essay1258 Words   |  6 PagesIn reviewing research regarding the use of technology in the classroom, there is a wealth of information available that varies from the extent of technology to the type of technology used in the classrooms. In order to identify and narrow the topic, it is important to look at the available research and the areas which need additional studies. The area of interest is specifically the use of technology with English Language Learners (ELL). However, in order to focus the research in that particularRead MoreResearch Based Strategies For Increasing Student Achievement821 Words   |  4 PagesAnnotated Bibliography Dean, C., Hubbell, E.R., Pitler, H., Stone, B. (2012). Classroom instruction that works: Research-based strategies for increasing student achievement. (2nd ed.). Denver, CO, 188 pp. Author Ceri B. Dean is vice president of field services at Midcontinent Research for Education and Learning (McREL). She holds multiple degrees in education, including a Ph.D. in Cirriculum and Instruction and an M.S. in Atmospheric Science. Elizabeth Ross Hubbell is a principal consultantRead MoreThe Class Room By William Wright G000516811318 Words   |  6 Pagesalike. 1. I enjoyed teaching and understanding how the school system operates 2. During the past few years I have notice a decline in the quality of education in schools in rural areas. . II. Orienting Material A. History shows that as far back as 1950 parents with kids with disabilities put pressure on legislatures which resulted in The Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975 (PL 94-142) B. The No Child Left Behind Act of 2002 focus is to make sure that all students are accounted forRead MoreImpact of Ict on Society2585 Words   |  11 PagesSISAT School of Information Systems Technology Faculty of Informatics ISIT900 Fundamentals of Contemporary Technologies Impact of ICT on Society Table of Contents PART A 1 1. Introduction 1 2. The annotations 1 2.1 Scholarly journal articles 1 2.2 Conference papers 1 2.3 Newspaper articles 1 2.4 Internet sources 1 3. Conclusion 2 Annotated Bibliographies 3 PART B (Endnote) 6 4. Introduction 6 5. The Endnote advantages 6 6. The Endnote disadvantages 7 7. The Recommendations 8Read MoreUnit 8 Writing Assignment6944 Words   |  28 PagesEssays and especially the research paper should be developed through a structured process. In addition to full drafts, such processes may involve students writing topic proposals, mini-drafts (e.g., a 3-page draft of a 10-page research paper), annotated bibliographies, short oral presentations that include textual supports (handouts, screen projections), genre variants (e.g., collage dialogues, narratives), in-progress reports and reflections, and so on. 4. Response papers are typically shorter papersRead MoreSkills and Competencies of a 21st Century Entrepreneur2580 Words   |  11 PagesContents INTRODUCTION 2 CRITICAL EVALUATION 3 PRE – START UP PLANNING AND PREPARATION 3 ENTREPRENEUR IN AN ORGANISATION 4 ENTREPRENEUR AS AN INDIVIDUAL 5 ENTREPRENEUR WITHIN THE SOCIETY 5 CONCLUSION 6 RECOMMENDATION 6 REFERENCES 7 ANNOTATED BIBILIOGRAPHY 8 APPENDIX 9 INTRODUCTION Various definitions have been given to the word entrepreneur, due to the changes and complexity of the world’s economic structure. Entrepreneurs have been cussed and discussed, declared to be social misfitsRead MoreSample Resume : Dublin City University Essay2132 Words   |  9 Pages15212972 Date: 13 November 2016 Programme: BA Humanities Module: History 2 Europe and the wider world? HIS2 Tutor: Dr Barry Whelan Content Assignment Report Form 3 Essay 4 ?What were the causes and motivations behind the ?Scramble for Africa 4 Bibliography 11 Assignment Report Form ASSIGNMENT REPORT FORM Student Name: Anita Hilderink Summary of Performance* Performance Components Bands Excellent (H1) Marks range: 70-100% Very Good (H2.1) Marks range: 60-69% Good (H2.2) Marks range:Read MoreEssay Elemica7043 Words   |  29 Pagesand some financial advises. Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY i 1. ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS 1 Company analysis 1 Value proposition 1 Core competencies 1 Market analysis and trends 2 Porter’s Competitive Forces Model 3 Information Technology (IT) challenges 4 2. BUSINESS CASE 6 Opportunities and objectives 6 Critical Success Factors (CSF) 7 Cost and benefits (ROI) 9 Risks 9 3. PROJECT PLANNING AND CHANGE MANAGEMENT 10 Project Planning 10 Change Management 10 4. ASSESSING

I Prefer to Live in Big Cities Than in Small Towns Free Essays

I Prefer to Live in Big Cities than in Small-towns In English, there is a well-known fairy story about a poor country boy, Dick Whittington, who goes to London because he believes that the streets of that city are â€Å"paved with gold†. The story is a tale of â€Å"from rags to riches†. Dick eventually becomes the Lord Mayor of London. We will write a custom essay sample on I Prefer to Live in Big Cities Than in Small Towns or any similar topic only for you Order Now Like the hero of that story, I love to take adventure in the cities. I grew up in a small town and then moved to a big city, so I have experienced the good and bad sides of both. I never thought that I would like living in a big city, but I was wrong. Cities contain a great assortment of people. Whenever I walk around a shopping precinct at midday on a weekend, I am fascinated by all the different types of people hurrying around the shops. Sometimes, I just sit on a public bench and simply watch the variegated streams of shoppers. Today, in the age of globe-trotting transport and communications, city life is more mixed than it has ever been. Capital cities are not cosmopolitan, and eager to attract foreign trade currency. There is a contemporary English joke which tells that â€Å"you can never find an Englishman in London†. The United States is made up of people of different races, religions, abilities, and interests. However, you seldom find such a variety of people in a smaller town. I think that living in an area where everyone was just like me would quickly become boring. Whether rightly or wrongly, I love the excitement of big cities. Small towns have a slow pace. Large cities mean you have to adapt to a variety of situations, like finding a new route to work or trying a new restaurant. I enjoy that challenge very much. Another pan of the excitement of city living is the variety of cultural activities available. There is a wide assortment of theatre, music and dance performances available in big cities. These things are rare in small ones. Governments and local authorities usually build public amenities in the big cities. Money is invested in transport, libraries, parks and museums. Often, countries will compete with each other for the best â€Å"show-case† building. Malaysia has built a skyscraper that is taller than is anything in New York. In large countries, region will compete against region: New York against Chicago, Shanghai against Hong Kong and Beijing. All of this is good for the citizen. The magic of the Dick Whittington story is rekindled in me when I enter a library in a magnificent building. If a person is at university studying art or music, a large city usually offers galleries and public performances. Even when I was a teenager, I appreciated the worth of living in a city because two or three times a year there was a rock concert by one of my favorite bands. There is one thing I want to talk is small-towns and big cities both have some problems in terms of transportation. In a small town, you have to own a car to ensure a comfortable living. You can’t get around without one because there isn’t any kind of public transportation. Big cities generally have heavy traffic and expensive parking, but there you have a choice of taking public transportation. It’s not free, but it’s often cheaper than driving when you consider gas and time. Especially if you don’t have a car, you’re better off in the city. And of course, security is a concern, and that’s one area where small towns are superior to big cities. Still, I would rather be a bit more cautious and live in a large city than to feel secure but bored. How to cite I Prefer to Live in Big Cities Than in Small Towns, Papers

Sunday, April 26, 2020

The character in An Inspector Calls Essay Example For Students

The character in An Inspector Calls Essay Which character in An Inspector Calls do you think is the most likeable and why? Give reasons for your answers and briefly discuss why you did not choose the other characters? As I have read the play An inspector calls written by J. B Priestly, I believe that Shelia Birling is my most likable character, out of all the characters. Shelia comes across as sweet caring women, but as you read on, you get the feeling she is a jealous girl with a temper. From the beginning of Act one you wouldnt think Shelia would be capable of provoking the suicide of Eva Smith. Sheilas actions towards Eva were wrong, and selfish. Eva gets sacked from her job, where she worked for Arthur Birling, after asking for a pay rise in 1910 at the end of September. Eva the found a job elsewhere as she was left with no money. She was working in Millwards. The Birlings were regular customers at Millwards. Shelia was there one day, and tried a dress on. We will write a custom essay on The character in An Inspector Calls specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now Eva was explaining something to her other customer and leaned the dress up against her. Eva and her customer was smiling and Shelia took it as if they were implying; Dont she look awful. Sheilas jealously then kicked in and she went to the manager of Millwards and demanded that; If they dont get rid of Eva, Id never go near that place again, and Id persuade my mother to close the account. As Shelias mother Sybil was a great customer to Millwards they wouldnt want to loose Sybil and The Birlings familys custom. Shelias actions were wrong, selfish and self centred. She was quick enough to get Sheila the sack from Millwards and leave Eva with nothing but then she feels guilty and sorry straight away. The inspector shows Shelia the picture of Eva Smith and she immediately says; I felt rotten at the time and now I feel a lot worse. She shows a lot of guilt. Sheilas parents think that she is childish person in this play. Out of all the characters she shows her guilt and honesty, and faces up to the consequences she has put herself in. She says to her father; But these girls arent cheap labour. Sheila also makes me think that she likes to be treated, as she would treat others as finding out Gerald as cheated on her she says to him; I respect you more now than I ever have before and at least you have been honest. Sheila tells the truth so she wants the truth and honesty back. Out of all her family Sheila I the only one who is most honest and truthful. As for the other characters such as; Mrs Sybil Birling. Sybil seems one of the caring types of women to start of with, but when the blame is put on her she decides to blame the father but when she finds out its her son Eric she is ashamed of him. Sybil is proud of her family and dont like to think any of them would do wrong. She turned Eva away just because she called her Mrs Birling! She keeps putting the blame on someone else. I didnt choose Sybil as my most likable character as she is very snobbish and selfish.

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Free Essays on Theft Study

Research Design For the purpose of explaining why individuals participate in employee theft crimes, the researcher conducted a cross-sectional study over a period of four months. To select the target population the researcher requested a list of adult offenders convicted of larceny crimes in the Waterford County Courts as the target population. These offenders were sentenced to the Waterford County Office of Probation. Chief Probation Officer Joseph Wells provided the researcher with a list of 4,000 adult offenders convicted of misdemeanor larceny crimes within the past four years in Waterford County. They were sentenced to a period of supervised probation. For the purpose of this research study, employee theft, also known as internal theft is defined as, the unauthorized taking of money, merchandise or services from one’s employer. The term employee includes those working part-time, full-time and regular employees and managerial staff. As previously mentioned in the theoretical model, the researcher presented four independent variables that seek to explain why individuals are involved in employee theft crimes. Variable one, known as the lack of conventional values, summarized in the Social Bond theory by Travis Hirschi. Conventional values are recognized as the normal or acceptable behaviors recognized by law-abiding citizens. The absence or lack of these values makes and individual susceptible to committing criminal acts. Variable two is known as the negative influence of peers and summarized in principle three of Edwin Sutherland’s Differential Association theory. For this research study, the negative influence of peer s is recognized as pressure or compelling factors from one’s peers including co-workers to participate in employee theft crimes despite the possibility of apprehension and punishment. The lack of management supervision, variable three, is recognized as the absence of adequate internal controls in the form ... Free Essays on Theft Study Free Essays on Theft Study Research Design For the purpose of explaining why individuals participate in employee theft crimes, the researcher conducted a cross-sectional study over a period of four months. To select the target population the researcher requested a list of adult offenders convicted of larceny crimes in the Waterford County Courts as the target population. These offenders were sentenced to the Waterford County Office of Probation. Chief Probation Officer Joseph Wells provided the researcher with a list of 4,000 adult offenders convicted of misdemeanor larceny crimes within the past four years in Waterford County. They were sentenced to a period of supervised probation. For the purpose of this research study, employee theft, also known as internal theft is defined as, the unauthorized taking of money, merchandise or services from one’s employer. The term employee includes those working part-time, full-time and regular employees and managerial staff. As previously mentioned in the theoretical model, the researcher presented four independent variables that seek to explain why individuals are involved in employee theft crimes. Variable one, known as the lack of conventional values, summarized in the Social Bond theory by Travis Hirschi. Conventional values are recognized as the normal or acceptable behaviors recognized by law-abiding citizens. The absence or lack of these values makes and individual susceptible to committing criminal acts. Variable two is known as the negative influence of peers and summarized in principle three of Edwin Sutherland’s Differential Association theory. For this research study, the negative influence of peer s is recognized as pressure or compelling factors from one’s peers including co-workers to participate in employee theft crimes despite the possibility of apprehension and punishment. The lack of management supervision, variable three, is recognized as the absence of adequate internal controls in the form ...

Monday, March 2, 2020

Four Ways New Graduates Can Get a Jump on the Job Market

Four Ways New Graduates Can Get a Jump on the Job Market While there are plenty of reasons for soon-to-be college grads to start the job application process early, perhaps none speak more clearly than this eye-opening statistic from management consulting firm Accenture: a mere 42 percent of new grads find jobs within the first six months of graduating. However, there are some simple steps you can take now to avoid winding up in that unemployed 58 percent. Use these tips and tricks before you graduate to get an inside edge on your job hunt. 1. Use Your ResourcesCollege career offices are full of services for graduating seniors. Whether you’re trying to identify a suitable field or looking for help with your application, career services offices offer valuable assistance.Schedule an appointment with a career counselor to learn more about what they can do for you. Many career services offers also sponsor job fairs, practice interview sessions, and other events to help grads connect with and impress potential employers.2. Refine Your Res umeWriting a resume that gets noticed is not a one-day process. Rather than waiting until the last minute and then rushing through the process, take time to consider your comprehensive academic, extracurricular and professional background.Begin by making a list of the activities you’ve participated in during your collegiate years, identifying specific skills and traits you acquired and used during this time. For example, while participating in a collegiate sport is one thing, captaining a team toward a division championship is something else. Be as detailed as possible, and focus on measurable results.Keep in mind that in today’s digital age, using the same resume for every job is unlikely to make the best impression. Every resume you submit should be customized to fit each unique job.3. Get ConnectedThe 21st century offers many new ways for employers and potential employees to meet. Creating a LinkedIn profile will help hiring agents find you, and also gives you the o pportunity to show yourself off as a tech-savvy job hunter.Online networking is also important. Fellow alumni, for example, can be identified and sorted on LinkedIn via everything from location to industry. Reaching out shows initiative while also helping to build your network of connections.But online networking hasn’t completely replaced face-to-face communications. Whether you volunteer in an area of interest or arrange for a coffee date with a family friend who works in your target industry, in-person inroads are also important.4. Police Your ProfileDoes your Facebook profile hold up to the professionalism test? If your Facebook feed is full of spring break pictures and snarky memes, it’s time for a reboot. Make sure your privacy settings are protected and/or remove any inappropriate photos and comments.Also, take a minute to Google yourself. If incriminating search results appear, you have some damage control to do to ensure that your online reputation is stellar. Just how frequently do employers look into candidates on the internet? A whopping 80 percent of employers use Google searches to vet candidates, according a Huffington Post article.There’s no reason to wait to have your diploma in hand before beginning your job search. In fact, the most successful job seekers adopt â€Å"take charge,† proactive attitudes. While graduation may seem like it’s eons away, it will be here before you know it. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a job offer firmly in hand when you toss your cap up into the air at graduation?

Saturday, February 15, 2020

Discuss the relationship between the design of religious architecture Essay

Discuss the relationship between the design of religious architecture and the interests and requirements of the religious tradit - Essay Example This paper will provide more insight into this analogy through discussing four historical religious architectures: the Altar of Zeus, Egyptian pyramids, Suleymaniye Mosque and St. Peter’s Basilica. The Altar of Zeus was created by ancient Greeks, Egyptian pyramids were erected by ancient Egyptians, Suleymaniye Mosque was developed by Muslims and St. Peter’s Basilica was designed by Romans. The Altar of Zeus provides a good Hellenistic Greek sculpture example, which was built between 166 and 156 BCE. The altar is crafted with art and sculpture, which depicts narrations. The Gigantochamy frieze, which adorns the base of the altar, has at least 100 distinct panels that show combats between gods and giants. Here, one connects with the Greek legend where Zaas decided to abandon Gaia’s after the new gods (led by Zeus and in support by Zaas) defeated the old gods (led by Cronus). The East Frieze sculpture, on the other hand, constitutes significant Olympic gods such as Hecate, Artemis, Zeus, Athena and Ares. In the same way, the north, south and west frieze sculptures continue with sculptural and relief narrations of various Greek gods.1 The altar, also known as the Altar of Pergamon, stands at 115 feet in width and 110 feet in depth. The altar was accessible through a stairway, from the west, which led up to a roofed hall extending to the front and sides of the altar. This altar is very important to the people, who regard it highly and it’s highly respected. It has been in existence for quite a long time and many people have high regard for the altar. Due to this fact, the altar of Pergamon is well preserved and taken care of. Ancient Egyptian pyramids held similar themes in architectural designs. The pyramids were erected on the west bank of the River Nile. This was in accordance with Egypt’s religious doctrine which stated that the dead should rest where the sun sets.2 In addition, most pyramids were covered with limestone, which was meant to give them a shiny appearance from a distance. Despite the fact that the pyramids were designed as tombstones for prominent persons such as kings and queens, they were embalmed with religious material. Outstandingly, the pyramids were meant to purify bodies in wait for the afterlife. Within the pyramids were sculptures, paintings and carvings, which portrayed spirituality. In addition, there were illustrations upon the tomb walls, also known as the Book of the Dead, which were meant to guide the deceased in their atonement of sins in preparation for the afterlife. The pyramids also consisted of airways and tunnels, which served to prevent decomposition. The Suleymaniye Mosque was named after Sultan Suleyman who requested it to be built after the Sehzade Mosque was not deemed as satisfactory. Sinan had built the Sehzade Mosque to commemorate the death of Prince Mehmed who had died of smallpox. The Suleymaniye Mosque was completed in 1557 and was of remarkable interior spa ce, height and intricate detail.3 The mosque consisted of four lengthy and thin minarets and a dome, which had a height of over 50 meters. Surrounding the mosque was a kulliye comprising of public baths, schools for teaching Quran, Hadith and primary school children, library, soup kitchen and a hospital. The public baths were situated near the entrance of the mosque since Muslims would take off their shoes before